post-title portfolio-title Carl Spitzweg – Flying the Kite no no

Carl Spitzweg – Flying the Kite

Artist

Franz Carl Spitzweg was born on February 5, 1808 in Unterpfaffenhofen. He died on September 23, 1885 in Munich. He was a German painter. His work is frequently used by example of German romanticism, even though a lot of his work is very humorously cartoony, ironic or has wink worthy contents. With his increasing age Spitzweg’s work became more idyllic. Because of his father, Spitzweg pursued a career as a pharmacist. He quit his job after he underwent a course of treatment in 1833, and came to the conclusion that he wanted to dedicate his time to painting. Spitzweg was a part of the artist club in Munich, yet he was a self-educated person in that area.

Artwork

“Drachensteigen” was created between 1880 and 1885, around the end of his life. It measures 12 x 38 cm (width x height).

Brief description

The format of this picture is, apart from the main character, the first thing you notice. The picture only 12 cm wide and 38 cm high. The ratio of picture is laid out almost exactly 1:3. The contents of the picture also has the same ratio. A cloudless, light blue sky seemingly expands infinitely high over grassland. One notices the outline of a city on the horizon. It works perfectly as a dividing line between the grass, which takes up 1/3 of the picture and the sky that takes up 2/3 of the picture. A path meanders through the grass. A woman with her child in her arm wanders towards the observer with two boys and a little girl. One of the boys is walking ahead while a white dog jumps to his feet. He enthusiastically stretches his arm to the sky. If you follow the direction he is reaching in, you will notice a very delicate almost invisible string that separates the sky. A floating kite is attached to the other end of the string. It is not sure which kite the string is attached to. However there is only one seemingly experienced boy in the front who is visibly holding a string with one arm. To the side of him are a little boy and girl who watch the spectacle. The girl is either holding a baby or a doll. The grass itself isn’t fully green. It’s more of a brown shade like shortly after winter when all of the snow has melted or in autumn after the haymaking. The cloudless sky seems vernal and makes you wonder where the wind is coming from that is needed to fly a kite. However that question seems irrelevant in the light of the idyllic scene, the carefree days of youth and the words of Johann Wolfgang Goethe in his poem “Outside of the gate” : “(…) Now turn around from this height, looking backward, townward see. Forth from the cave-like, gloomy gate crowds a motley and swarming array. Everyone suns himself gladly today. The risen Lord they celebrate, for they themselves have now arisen from lowly houses’ mustiness, from handicraft’s and factory’s prison, from the roof and gables that oppress, from the bystreets’ crushing narrowness, from the churches’ venerable night, they are all brought out into light. (…)”. As much as the feeling of freedom overcomes the observer at the sight of the open sky, its counterpoint can be found in the smallness and fragility of a human being, who – like a floating dragon – is at the mercy of the play of nature. But in this instant, peace and lightness reign.

Gerne & Material

Painting of Romantic. Painted with oil on a canvas.

Where can I find this in Berlin?

In the Alten Nationalgalerie on the Museuminsel, Bodestraße 1-3, 10178 Berlin-Mitte. To find out how to get there, please click the link below the description

The format of this picture is, apart from the main character, the first thing you notice. The picture only 12 cm wide and 38 cm high. The ratio of picture is laid out almost exactly 1:3. The contents of the picture also has the same ratio. A cloudless, light blue sky seemingly expands infinitely high over grassland. One notices the outline of a city on the horizon. It works perfectly as a dividing line between the grass, which takes up 1/3 of the picture and the sky that takes up 2/3 of the picture. A path meanders through the grass. A woman with her child in her arm wanders towards the observer with two boys and a little girl. One of the boys is walking ahead while a white dog jumps to his feet. He enthusiastically stretches his arm to the sky. If you follow the direction he is reaching in, you will notice a very delicate almost invisible string that separates the sky. A floating kite is attached to the other end of the string. It is not sure which kite the string is attached to. However there is only one seemingly experienced boy in the front who is visibly holding a string with one arm. To the side of him are a little boy and girl who watch the spectacle. The girl is either holding a baby or a doll. The grass itself isn’t fully green. It’s more of a brown shade like shortly after winter when all of the snow has melted or in autumn after the haymaking. The cloudless sky seems vernal and makes you wonder where the wind is coming from that is needed to fly a kite. However that question seems irrelevant in the light of the idyllic scene, the carefree days of youth and the words of Johann Wolfgang Goethe in his poem “Outside of the gate” : “(…) Now turn around from this height, looking backward, townward see. Forth from the cave-like, gloomy gate crowds a motley and swarming array. Everyone suns himself gladly today. The risen Lord they celebrate, for they themselves have now arisen from lowly houses’ mustiness, from handicraft’s and factory’s prison, from the roof and gables that oppress, from the bystreets’ crushing narrowness, from the churches’ venerable night, they are all brought out into light. (…)”. As much as the feeling of freedom overcomes the observer at the sight of the open sky, its counterpoint can be found in the smallness and fragility of a human being, who – like a floating dragon – is at the mercy of the play of nature. But in this instant, peace and lightness reign.

Hier geht es zu dem Museum in Berlin, in dem Sie dieses Meisterwerk finden

ART@Berlin:  Carl Spitzweg – Flying the Kite

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